Prentice 120e Manual

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Prentice 120e Manual 4,5/5 5069reviews

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Manufacturer: Prentice. Detail Description: 1999 Prentice 120E Behind the Cab Knuckleboom Log Loader with Dual Ladders, Mounted on a 1999 Heavy Duty Bearing Mixer Truck with 86,000 miles. Prentice 120e Loader Manual.pdf eBooks for Free - Results for prentice 120e loader manual High Speed Direct Downloads prentice 120e loader manual - [Full Version] 8558. 2003 Prentice 120e Manual pdf available these days for download. Grab this 2003 Prentice 120e Manual ebook in PDF, ePub, doc, PDF, DjVu and txt file format.

Prentice 120e Manual

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I'm new here but I can help you with this. (I'm lurking mainly to learn more about what YOU all do but this is something I do ) I can give you a ballpark figure if you can tell me approximately - what age it is (if it still has a tag with a serial number, I can find out how old it is) - does it have extendaboom (you say 20' so I'm assuming this is a 'no')?

- does it have a grapple (bucket) attached? If so, is it bypass or clamshell type?

Prentice 120e Parts Manual

- is it joystick operated or 4-lever? Buying a used one is kind of a complicated deal unless you're looking at log loaders every day. There are several things I can tell you to look for.

If you're still looking at these two units, I'd be glad to throw my 2 cents in. Thanks for offering to help. I also found a Barko 80, built sometime in the 1990s. Onwer claims it has never been used. I know from the pictures he sent it is newer b/c it has telescoping outriggers instead of the old fold-out type. As to the specs on some of this stuff, the guys who own them really don't know much about them. The prentice 120 does not telecope, and it does not have joystick controls or extendable boom.

It has a by-pass grapple. Assuming the 120 is sound, what is the ballpart on price (if you can guess, given the very limited facts).

This is what I have for ya. 1) Be careful on the Barko - limited parts availability.

Barko 80's are good machines but EXPENSIVE to fix 2) On the Prentice - I am assuming now that it is a Prentice 120 (instead of 120C or 120E) - due to the fact that it is not joystick controlled - it's a four-lever, yes? What you have is a non-continuous rotation loader and (probably) non-continuous rotation grapple with no extendaboom. Check for any indication of wet, dirty looking surfaces. I would be astonished if it didn't have at least a few leaks but a lot of grime in a specific area is a red flag. Dodge Sprinter Factory Service Repair Oem Manual.

(including the rotator/head on the grapple - grapples can get expensive to rebush/reseal as well) All of that said, I wouldn't give more than $2500 - $3500 (maybe $4000 if it's a gem and I'm thinking retail WITH a pump and tank) for it in good, operable condition. (The Prentice 110 is worth even less because it's an obsolete model) BUT. Keep in mind. I deal mainly with loggers and commercial tree services.

Loggers here will not tolerate a loader without extendaboom (though in NH & ME this differs somewhat) and non-continuous rotation went OUT a long time ago. Most of my customers would laugh at me if I tried to sell them a non-continuous rotation machine. Basically, it is a non-saleable piece in MY neck of the woods. 3) I guess the main question is how frequently you plan to use the loader - that is, how significant a part of your business would it be?

I would say that your decision should be based more on the significance of the equipment to you rather than $. The 120 (or even the Barko) you're talking about would be a perfectly acceptable loader to someone who is not planning to use it every day and speed is not a factor. If, however, you plan to handle a large volume and speed is a factor, I would suggest 'upgrading' your search to a Prentice 120C (or another brand of joystick controlled, continuous rotation loader with continuous rotation on the grapple also). I'd be happy to answer more questions so ask away! Thanks for the input. I am looking for a loader to mount behind the cab of a dump truck.

I will use it for residential removals. I am sure I need a twin-screw (double-axle) rear-end to carry a reasonable size payload. What I am learning is that the cost for a $45,000 to $55,000 truck like this is mostly in the cost of the truck, the cost to mount, and the cost to fabricate the box.

The loader is the least expensive item. I know the Prentice 110 was discontinued in about 1982, but there are still some in operation. If I found one that was in good condition, would I have trouble getting parts, etc? Thanks, Steven. NebClimber said: “ I am looking for a loader to mount behind the cab of a dump truck.

I will use it for residential removals. Weider Equipment Home Gym Parts Manual. I am sure I need a twin-screw (double-axle) rear-end to carry a reasonable size payload.Assuming you have a CDL, the optimal set up here is 18 - 20,000 lb front axle and 40, 44 or 46,000 lb rears (the drive axles, ie. Most of the time, we also add a 20,000 lb air axle to bring the Gross Weight Rating up - increasing your payload. This is standard in NY/VT - we call it a 'tri-axle log truck'.

Of course, if you don't have a commercial license, then the options become more limited because you're working with a limited Gross Weight (GVW) - the weight of every component: empty weight of truck, weight of loader, weight of body, etc. Decreases the amount of payload you're able to legally carry. “ What I am learning is that the cost for a $45,000 to $55,000 truck like this is mostly in the cost of the truck, the cost to mount, and the cost to fabricate the box.